From Peripheral Domination to Internal Colonialism: Socio-Political Change of the Lakota on Standing Rock

  • James V. Fenelon California State University, San Bernardino

Abstract

This paper discusses changing "national" identities of the Lakota and Dakota on Standing Rock, "Sioux" Indian Reservation, through an overview of the traditional Lakota, the United States, conceptual differences of Lakota Oyate with U.S. sovereign power, and political representations. Envelopment/incorporation of the Lakota are discussed as struggles over sovereignty and treaty rights leading to formation of the "Sioux Nation" and six separated Lakota-Sioux reservations. External national identities range from "Hostiles" alien labels to "Indians" ultimately as citizens. American citizenship is reviewed as both inclusion and dissolution, with the re-organization, political re-construction, and assimilation strategies of the United States. 20th century resistance and cultural domination are considered in the American Indian Movement as political resurgence.
Published
1997-08-26
How to Cite
Fenelon, J. V. (1997). From Peripheral Domination to Internal Colonialism: Socio-Political Change of the Lakota on Standing Rock. Journal of World-Systems Research, 3(2), 259-320. https://doi.org/10.5195/jwsr.1997.110
Section
General Section